Mainstays of current treatment

Amblyopia is often treated by prescribing glasses, patching, administering atropine drops, surgery, and/or using visual exercises.

Mainstays of current treatment

Amblyopia is often treated by prescribing glasses, patching, administering atropine drops, surgery, and/or using visual exercises.

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Glasses

The first step in treating amblyopia is the correction of any refractive error by prescribing glasses. This addresses both differences in refractive error between the 2 eyes (anisometropia) and high degrees of hypermetropia (long farsightedness) in both eyes, which can be a cause of strabismus. Some children with amblyopia do not have significant refractive errors and will not benefit from glasses.

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Patching

Patching is a monocular approach to ambylopia. The healthy eye is covered, which forces the amblyopic eye to work harder to get visually stronger. This approach requires that a child wear a patch either all day or for several hours each day for several weeks to months. Because of the obvious appearance of the patch on the eye and the accompanying social and psychological stigma, it is not uncommon for children to resist wearing it, which can lead to treatment failure. While this approach has been used for many years, it requires significant effort and persistence and may not be successful because it doesn’t address visual signaling pathways to the brain.

25% will experience relapse after patching treatment, and it is not prescribed for patients over the age of 12.

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Atropine DROPS

Drops work by temporarily blurring vision in the unaffected eye, thereby forcing the eye with amblyopia to be used. The advantage of atropine treatment is that the parent simply places a drop in the child’s eye once a day. The disadvantage of using drops is that, like patching, this is a monocular approach that does not correct the visual signaling pathways to the brain.

20% will experience relapse after atropine drops treatment, and it is not prescribed for patients over the age of 12.

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Surgery

There is no specific surgical procedure that improves the vision affected by amblyopia. However, surgery may be used to straighten misaligned eyes. Alternatively, surgery may be used to remove cataracts, if present. After surgery, vision correction with glasses or contact lenses and patching are typically required.

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Vision therapy

This approach utilizes eye exercises meant to stimulate the visual cortex—the region of the brain responsible for image processing. These treatments suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor compliance, high rates of relapse, and questionable effectiveness.

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Amblyotech’s binocuclear technology is designed to encourage cooperation between both eyes, resulting in a binocular solution and the establishment of 3D vision, with proven clinical efficacy.

Patients Need Effective Treatment,
Without the Stigma

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